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Affordable Atom box is a LAN appliance or an IP PBX

Oct 8, 2010 — by Jonathan Angel — from the LinuxDevices Archive

Win Enterprises announced a “unified communications platform” for small business built around Intel's Atom N450 processor. The PL-60780 offers functionality including voice switching, enterprise routing, VPN, firewall, and more, sporting 14 gigabit Ethernet ports and full-height PCI Express x1 expansion, the company says.

Win Enterprises says its PL-60780 is a commercial implementation of Intel's Delray Beach platform, and may be configured as either a network appliance or an IP PBX. The device will support voice switching, enterprise routing, firewall and VPN, quality of service, application services, gigabit LAN/WAN, and optional Wi-Fi access, the company says.


The Win Enterprises PL-60780
(Click to enlarge)

All this makes the device one of the most ambitious Atom-powered devices we've seen. The PL-60780 is said to use Intel's 1.6GHz N450 and ICH8M I/O controller, the latter's PCI Express interfaces apparently connecting to the unit's multiple gigabit Ethernet ports (see block diagram below).


A block diagram of Intel's Delray Beach platform
(Click to enlarge)

As pictured below, the PL-60780's rear panel includes ten switched gigabit Ethernet ports. The device further includes a gigabit WAN port, a GbE-to-switch port, a GbE-to-Aux port, and a GbE-switched-to-Aux port, for a total of 14, according to Win Enterprises.


The Win Enterprises PL-60780
(Click to enlarge)

Win Enterprises says the switched gigabit Ethernet ports are controllable either by the ICH8M or by a custom auxiliary card, depending upon a jumper setting. The PL-60780 accommodates a 2/3rds-length, full-height PCI Express x1 card, the company adds.

The device supports VGA output via an internal header — or so the Delray Beach block diagram suggests, though Win Enterprises didn't say — and also offers four USB 2.0 ports (two internal and two external). Line in and line out audio jacks are on the rear panel, and an internal header supports an optional TPM (trusted platform module), according to the company.

The PL-60780 holds up to 2GB of DDR2 RAM via a single SODIMM slot, and includes both a bay for a 2.5-inch SATA hard disk drive and a slot for a Type II CompactFlash card, according to Win Enterprises. An 8GB NAND flash module is an available option, the company adds.

Win Enterprises says the PL-60780 supports up to 40 users, and runs either Windows XP or Linux varieties including Fedora, MontaVista, and OpenSUSE Linux Enterprise 10. The company adds that the Asterisk open-source IP PBX software package is supported; meanwhile, we noticed that Intel's own Delray Beach product page offers downloads of ready-to-use hard disk or CompactFlash images for the device.

Features and specifications listed by Win Enterprises for the PL-60780 include:

  • Processor — 1.66GHz Intel Atom N450
  • Chipset — ICH8M
  • Memory — up to 2GB of DDR2 RAM via single SODIMM slot
  • Storage — 2.5-inch SATA hard disk drive or Type II CompactFlash; optional 8GB NAND flash module
  • Expansion — PCI Express x1 slot (2/3rds length)
  • Networking — 14 x gigabit Ethernet ports
  • Other I/O:
    • 1 x VGA (spec'd by Intel, though not Win Enterprises)
    • 4 x USB 2.0 (2 internal, 2 external)
    • audio — line in and line out
  • Power requirements — 12VDC via 65-Watt power supply
  • Operating range — n/s
  • Dimensions — 11.5 x 8.83 x 1.94 inches

Further information

Win Enterprises says the PL-60780 is available now, for prices that start at $497 each in OEM quantities. More information on the device may be found on the company's product page, here.

More information on Intel's Delray Beach platform, including the disk images mentioned earlier, may be found here.


This article was originally published on LinuxDevices.com and has been donated to the open source community by QuinStreet Inc. Please visit LinuxToday.com for up-to-date news and articles about Linux and open source.



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