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Large panel PC targets check-in, ordering

Aug 6, 2010 — by Jonathan Angel — from the LinuxDevices Archive

Axiomtek announced a 22-inch panel PC targeting applications such as check-in/out at airports and hotels, restaurant ordering, and visitor control. The IFO2225-830 has a sealed front bezel, a resolution of 1680 x 1050 pixels, a 1.3 megapixel webcam, a VGA output, plus four serial ports and four USB 2.0 ports, the company says.

Axiomtek's IFO2225-830 is just one of many panel PCs fielded by the company, which include, for example, last year's 8.4-inch GOT-5840T-830, 12.1-inch GOT-812, and 12.1-inch GOT-5120T-830. Last May, Axiomtek released a 17-inch panel PC, the IFO2175-830, which is similar in most respects to the present offering.

Like these earlier devices — and because of some canny motherboard recycling, no doubt — the IFO2225-830 again uses Intel's 1.6GHz Atom N270 processor, with the usual 945GSE northbridge and ICH7M southbridge. We'd call this chipset "obsolete" except that Intel's newer "Pineview" Atoms offer only an incremental increase in performance, and their slightly lower power consumption would make little difference in this application.


Axiomtek's IFO2225-830
(Click to enlarge)

Intended for applications such as airport and hotel check-in/out, restaurant ordering, or digital signage, the IFO2225-830 has a 22-inch resistive touchscreen with a resolution of 1680 x 1050 pixels. Viewing angle is 178 degrees (better than the 160 degrees quoted for the IFO2175-830), and the brightness rating is 300 nits, says Axiomtek.

According to Axiomtek, a single SODIMM slot on the IFO2225-830 accepts up to 2GB of DDR2 memory. Operating system installation, meanwhile, can be via either an internal CompactFlash slot or a 2.5-inch SATA hard disk drive.

The front bezel of the IFO2225-830 is said to be sealed against liquids and dust to the IP65 standard. The overall housing bears an IPX1 rating, meaning it can resist "water drips," the company adds.

Interfaces, all located at the bottom of the device, include four serial ports (one RS232/422/485 and three RS232), a VGA output, a gigabit Ethernet port, four USB 2.0 ports, and line audio output, according to Axiomtek. Internally, there's said to be a PCI Express Mini slot in addition to the CompactFlash slot we've already mentioned.

Axiomtek says the IFO2225-830 comes with a 1.3 megapixel webcam, and is orderable with what's merely referred to as a combo drive (DVD playback may or may not be offered). Also optional is an 802.11b/g wireless LAN adapter, presumably occupying the PCI Express Mini slot.

Features and specifications listed by Axiomtek for the IFO2225-830 include:

  • Processor — Intel Atom N270 clocked at 1.6GHz
  • Chipset — 945GSE northbridge and ICH7M southbridge
  • Memory — SODIMM socket accepts up to 2GB of RAM
  • Display — 22-inch resistive touchscreen display with 1680 x 1050 pixel resolution
  • Webcam — 1.3 megapixel
  • Storage — Type I/II CompactFlash and 2.5-inch bay for SATA/IDE hard disk drive
  • Expansion — Mini PCI Express slot
  • Networking:
    • LAN — gigabit Ethernet
    • WLAN — 802.11b/g (optional)
  • Other I/O:
    • 1 x RS232/422/485; 3 x RS232
    • VGA
    • Audio — line out
    • 4 x USB 2.0
  • Power — 10 to 30VDC via 60 Watt AC adapter
  • Operating temperature — 32 to 104 deg. F (0 to 40 deg. C)
  • Dimensions — 22.58 x 15.71 x 2.69 inches
  • Weight — 18.12 pounds

Further information

Axiomtek did not provide pricing, but says the IFO2225-830 is available now. More information on the device may be found on the company's website, here.

As is all too often the case, Axiomtek cites only Windows 7, Windows XP, and Windows XP Embedded as supported operating systems. We're confident the device can run Linux via its Intel chipset, but it may take some hunting to find the required touchscreen driver.


This article was originally published on LinuxDevices.com and has been donated to the open source community by QuinStreet Inc. Please visit LinuxToday.com for up-to-date news and articles about Linux and open source.



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