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Linux PIN pad nears PCI PED approval

Nov 21, 2006 — by LinuxDevices Staff — from the LinuxDevices Archive

Italian POS (point-of-sale systems) specialist DA Sistemi Group, will soon obtain security approval from Visa, MasterCard, and JCB for a Linux-based PIN-entry terminal. The PINPAD DAndY Pad incorporates a security-oriented SoC (system-on-chip) and associated Linux software from Innova-Card, and targets supermarket and store… counter payment transactions.


(Click to enlarge)

The DAndY Pad (formerly the PP 4000) is a small, lightweight pin-pad that is meant intended for use as a peripheral to DA's Darwin, ZVT3000, and DAndY POS terminals. It features a 128 x 64 pixel STN reflective graphical LCD display, a 15-key keyboard, a buzzer, and a 115Kbps serial interface to POS terminals. Additionally, the 5.1 x 2.7 x 0.9 inch PIN-entry pad boasts an ergonomic design that “fits perfectly in the palm of the hand,” according to DA.

The device is based on Innova-Card's USIP Professional, an application-specific SoC that was designed for use as an embedded controller in secure smartcard readers and PIN-entry pad applications. The SoC integrates a MIPS32 RISC processor core, along with on-chip RAM and flash memory, cryptography, and various input/output ports. Thanks to the “true random number generator and an AES crypto processor” provided by the USIP, the DAndY provides on-the-fly data encryption, DA says.

The DAandY Pad also incorporates Innova-Card's Linux-based pin-pad software stack. DA says it “made the most of both Linux and [Innova-Card's USIP SoC] to release the highly secure DAndY Pad in a very short time.” Also helpful was “the modular architecture of Linux, [which] allowed a simple and fast porting of DA Sistemi Group's drivers and applications.”

The DAndY Pad appears to be available now. Pricing was not disclosed.

Lots more details on the USIP SoC are in our prior coverage of the announcement of its Linux port.


 
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