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Internet TV broadcaster targets MIDs

Aug 25, 2008 — by Eric Brown — from the LinuxDevices Archive — 1 views

Internet TV (ITV) service provider Move Networks announced an ITV media player optimized for mobile Internet devices (MIDs) based on the Intel Atom and the Linux-based Moblin stack. The Move Media Player for MIDs will deliver video from partners like ABC, Fox, and ESPN.

(Click for larger view of some Move partner Move Media Player screens)

The Move network uses an “adaptive streaming” technique that is said to adapt the quality of video streams to available bandwidth. Move divides video files into small segments called "streamlets" and creates multiple copies encoded at different bit rates. Each Move Player client reports back to the web servers on available bandwidth, and as the stream progresses, the system chooses the best possible streamlet version to fit the bandwidth. This enables even HD-quality video to scale with good quality to a mass audience, claims Move.


Sample Move Player screens from Move's TV partners
(Click to enlarge)

The player is said to offer DVR-style navigation controls, including scrub playback. Other features include “defining” and sharing video clips, and inserting clips into blogs or web pages.

Stated John Edwards, CEO, Move Networks, “The lines between the TV, the computer and mobile devices are blurring, while user demand for high-quality Internet television programming that they can view on all of these platforms is growing.”

In other news, RealNetworks recently released its own RealPlayer media player for MIDs. Like the Move Player, it is aimed at the MID-targeted Moblin stack. Real followed up last week with an announcement of a similar Moblin player aimed at Linux-based, Intel Atom-powered netbooks and nettops.

Availability

Move Networks offered no details on the availability of the Move Media Player for MIDs.


 
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