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Cortex-A8 SBC runs Windows CE, Linux, or Android

Sep 9, 2011 — by Jonathan Angel — from the LinuxDevices Archive — 7 views

Advantech announced a single board computer (SBC) that runs Windows CE 6.0, Linux, or Android on a Texas Instruments OMAP35x processor. The PCM-C3500 has either 128MB or 256MB of RAM, can include 2GB of flash storage, has four serial ports and four USB 2.0 ports, and features an Ethernet port with RJ45 connector, according to the company.

Advantech says its PCM-C3500 is available with either the TI OMAP3503 or OMAP3530, both clocked at 600MHz in this application. These are low- and high-end versions of TI's Cortex-A8-based OMAP35x system-on-chips (SoCs), first announced in Feb. 2008. The OMAP 3530 adds an integrated DaVinci TMS320C64x+ DSP and the OpenGL ES 2.0-compatible Imagination PowerVR SGX graphics accelerator.


Advantech's PCM-C3500
(Click to enlarge)

The PCM-C3500 (above) measures 4.72 x 3.54 inches, uses a maximum of three Watts (two is typical), and may be powered via DC ranging from 10 to 23 Volts. There's also 128MB of RAM and a bootable SD slot, while the OMAP3530 model doubles RAM to 256MB and also adds 2GB of integral flash storage.

The device's coastline features a 10/100 Ethernet port, an RS232 port (OMAP3530 model only), two USB 2.0 ports, and a USB On-The-Go connector. The rest of the PCM-C3500's interfaces are provided via pin headers, and include two additional RS232 ports, an RS485 port (OMAP3530 model only), two more USB 2.0 ports, and audio I/O, according to Advantech.

Only the OMAP3530-equipped PCM-C3500 supports OpenGL ES 1.1 & 2.0, OpenVG 1.0, and Direct3D, and it's also the choice if you want to display 720p video. But both models include a four-wire interface for a resistive touchscreen, a 24-bit LVDS connector, plus I2C, SPI, and 6×6 keypad interfaces, Advantech says.


A block diagram of Advantech's PCM-C3500
(Click to enlarge)

According to Advantech, the PCM-C3500 is also available in an evaluation kit that includes a touchscreen (size unspecified), cables, a power adapter, plus a CD-ROM containing test utilities and an SDK (software development kit). With or without the kit, the SBC is also available with a bootable, licensed Windows CE image, the company adds. The SBC is also said to support Linux and Android, however.

Advantech says the PCM-C3500 features a real-time clock and watchdog timer. The SBC operates in temperatures from 32 to 140 deg. F (standard), or, with optional component changes, between -4 to 158 deg. F or -40 to 185 deg. F, according to the company.

Specifications listed by Advantech for the PCM-C3500 include:

  • Processor — TI OMAP3503 or OMAP3530 (720MHz)
  • Graphics — OMAP3530 version includes OpenGL ES 1.1 & 2.0, OpenVG 1.0, Direct3D, and 720p support
  • Memory — 128MB of RAM (OMAP3503 version), 256MB (OMAP3530 version)
  • Storage — 2GB of flash (OMAP3530 version only); SD slot; pin headers for second SD slot
  • Networking — 1 x 10/100 Ethernet (RJ45 connector)
  • Other I/O:
    • Coastline:
      • 2 x USB 2.0
      • 1 x USB On-The-Go
      • 1 x RS232 (OMAP3530 model only)
    • Via pin headers:
      • 24-bit LVDS connector
      • 4-wire resistive interface
      • 2 x I2C
      • 1 x SPI
      • 6×6 keypad
      • 2 x RS232
      • 1 x RS485 (OMAP3530 model only)
      • 1 x TTL
      • audio — mic in, line in, line out, speaker out
  • Power — 10~24VDC; 2 Watts standard (max. 3 Watts)
  • Operating range — 32 to 140 deg. F, -4 to 158 deg. F or -40 to 185 deg. optional
  • Dimensions — 4.72 x 3.54 inches

Further information

Advantech did not detail pricing, nor does it yet seem to have fielded a product page for the PCM-C3500. However, it does offer a data sheet in PDF format.

Jonathan Angel can be reached at [email protected] and followed at www.twitter.com/gadgetsense.


This article was originally published on LinuxDevices.com and has been donated to the open source community by QuinStreet Inc. Please visit LinuxToday.com for up-to-date news and articles about Linux and open source.



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