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Linux-based WiFi radio hits the big time

Jan 9, 2008 — by Eric Brown — from the LinuxDevices Archive — 6 views

French bluetooth accessory specialist Com One announced that its Linux-based Phoenix WiFi Radio has upgraded firmware and is being widely distributed. The Internet-enabled clock-radio is now being sold by online retailers tigerdirect.com, mobileplanet.com, and buy.com, says Com One, while… distributors include DBL, D&H, and Nice Stuff.

Introduced last February, the Phoenix WiFi Radio provides access to thousands of Internet radio stations, receiving and playing media from HTTP-based Internet radio streams based on ICEcast/SHOUTcast and Microsoft Media Streaming Protocol (MSP). Equipped with an Intel PXA270 (Bulverde) processor clocked to 300MHz, it comes with 32MB of RAM, and boots Linux 2.6.15-7 from 8MB of Flash. It includes a 128×64 pixel monochromatic LCD screen and a USB host port supporting USB mass storage devices and USB Bluetooth transceivers.


Phoenix WiFi Radio

New firmware provides improved WiFi quality and stability for the 802.11b/g receiver, says Com One. The WiFi reception is improved with an enhanced dynamic network bandwidth manager and a WPA connection that is said to be 25 percent faster than the original. The new firmware also adds new snooze and sleep functions, and access to UPnP music sources via Windows Media Player running on a networked-attached computer.

The 8.7 x 4.8 x 3-inch (220 x 123 x 78mm) radio weighs 1 pound, 4.5 ounces (0.6kg) with batteries. The device's audio subsystem includes a dual 2 Watt stereo amplifier, and a pair of 1.6-inch (4cm), 8-ohm speakers rated to 4 Watts (RMS) each. The unit also has audio line-out on an 1/8th-inch (3.5mm) stereo mini jack. Audio system bandwidth is claimed to be an impressive (though bass-less) 170Hz to 20kHz.

Availability

Com One's Phoenix WiFi Radio is available now at tigerdirect.com, mobileplanet.com and buy.com, with a MSRP of $250.


 
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