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Thin client drives four displays, runs Linux

Oct 10, 2006 — by LinuxDevices Staff — from the LinuxDevices Archive — 6 views

Igel Technology has released a new thin client device that can simultaneously drive four independent digital or analog display screens. The fanless PanaVeo thin client is based on an Intel Celeron M processor, and is available with Linux, according to the company.

(Click here for larger image)

The fanless PanaVeo uses Matrox EpicA graphics cards to drive either two or four simultaneous displays in standard or widescreen (16:9) formats. Two models are currently offered — the 7602 supports two displays, while the 7604 supports four. The 7602 boasts a maximum analog display resolution of 2048 x 1536.

Igel lists the following key features and specifications for the PanaVeo series:

  • Processor — Celeron M, clocked at 800 MHz
  • Memory — 256 MB RAM standard, 1 GB max; 1 GB flash
  • Display resolution:
    • 7602:
      • 2x 1920 x 1200 digital
      • 2x 1920 x 1440 analog
      • 1x 2048 x 1536 analog
    • 7604 — up to 4x 1600 x 1200
  • Video memory:
    • 7602 — 64 MB
    • 7604 — 128 MB
  • I/O ports:
    • 10/100 Ethernet
    • 4 USBG 2.0 — two on front panel, two on rear
    • 2 RS232 serial
    • AC97 audio
    • parallel port
    • PS/2 keyboard and mouse
  • Expansion — none specified
  • Dimensions — 9.4 x 8.7 x 2.8 inches (240 x 220 x 72 mm)
  • Communication protocols and support includes:
    • ICA for Citrix Presentation Server
    • Citrix Program Neighborhood functionality
    • RDP Client for Microsoft Windows Server
    • PowerTerm Emulation Suite
  • Additional software includes:

    • Java-enabled web browser
    • SAP GUI for Java
    • mplayer for multimedia playback
    • Igel Remote Management Suite

Availability

Evaluation units of the PanaVeo are currently available, Igel says. In addition to Linux, the devices are also available with Windows XP Embedded.


 
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