News Archive (1999-2012) | 2013-current at LinuxGizmos | IoT and Embedded News Feed |    About   

Panel PC targets Linux-based medical devices

Nov 16, 2007 — by Jonathan Angel — from the LinuxDevices Archive — 3 views

Kontron has announced a lightweight panel PC for the medical industry, designed to run Linux. The MediClient features fanless operation and low power consumption, making it compatible with battery-driven applications such as mobile nursing stations, according to the company.

(Click here for a larger picture of the Kontron Mediclient)

The MediClient is packaged in a tough ABS plastic housing, said to make it scratchproof and resistant to chemicals or corrosion. It has a 1024 by 768 touchscreen display that's claimed to be usable with either gloves or stylus pens.

Kontron is offering the MediClient with a 600MHz Celeron M processor along with up to 1GB of RAM. Storage is provided by a choice of either internal CompactFlash or an optional hard disk drive.

The device can also take a beating, Kontron says. It's rated via the DIN EN 60068-2-27 standard to withstand a 15g shock with 11-millisecond duration while operating, or a 30g shock with 11-millisecond duration while stored.

Interestingly, this panel PC is also rated for altitude. Kontron rates it for operation at up to 10,000 feet, and storage at up to 15,000 feet. Operating temperature can range from 0 to 50 degrees C.

Features and specifications cited by Kontron for the MediClient include:

  • Processor — Celeron M, clocked at 600MHz
  • Memory — up to 1GB
  • Display:
    • 1024 x 768 display
    • 350-nit brightness
    • resistive analog touchscreen

  • Networking — 2 x 10/100 Ethernet
  • Other I/O:
    • 2 x USB ports
    • RS-232 serial port
    • optional CAN fieldbus

  • Expansion — internal CompactFlash slot
  • Power — 11.4 – 28.8 VDC
  • Dimensions — 14.3 x 11.2 x 2.4 inches (363 x 286 x 62 mm)

Kontron says it has verified that the Mediclient is compatible with embedded Linux, Windows XP Embedded, and Windows CE.

Availability

The device appears to be in production now. Pricing was not disclosed.


 
This article was originally published on LinuxDevices.com and has been donated to the open source community by QuinStreet Inc. Please visit LinuxToday.com for up-to-date news and articles about Linux and open source.



Comments are closed.