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Board targets x86 vehicle PCs

Mar 19, 2009 — by Eric Brown — from the LinuxDevices Archive — 1 views

Via is sampling its first x86 board targeting the in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) device market. The Linux-compatible IVP-7500 board is based on a fanless 1GHz Via Eden processor, supports GPS and in-vehicle video monitoring, and targets both consumer infotainment and fleet management applications.

(Click for larger view of the IVP-7500)

Via called the IVP-7500 the “first in a series” of x86 in-vehicle platforms. The board is available initially only to high-volume customers.

The IVP-7500 is touted as enabling features such as digital media library storage and playback, location tracking, route planning, and navigation. Meanwhile, suggested commercial applications involve digital tachograph, odometer, and security functionality. The IVP-7500 supports car-mounted cameras for video assisted parking, license plate recognition, and highway surveillance recording, Via adds.


Via says the IVP-7500 can be concealed inside a car's instrument panel

The 4.5 x 7.3-inch Via IVP-7500 is built around a 1GHz Via Eden CPU and CX700M2 northbridge/southbridge, and is equipped with a SODIMM socket that supports up to 1GB of DDR2 memory. The board's Via UniChrome Pro II AGP graphics chipset supports an LCD (TTL) panel, as well as MPEG-2/4 and WMV9 video decoding, and an HD audio codec is also provided. The IVP-7500 supplies audio I/O, TV-out and VGA outputs, as well as an A/V input and “V-CAM” interface for video monitoring.


Via's IVP-7500
(Click to enlarge)

For storage, the Via IVP-7500 is said to feature an SD card interface, as well as an FFC cable to support a 1.8-inch IDE hard disk drive (HDD). Two real-world USB ports and a USB pin header support further storage, and the device offers an FM stereo transmitter, and a GPS module with an I-PEX antenna. A Bluetooth radio and an infrared adapter are said to support hands-free applications.

With its single and dual DIN support, the IVP-7500 can be applied to a variety of dashboard, in-seat, and headrest designs, says the company. The board is also said to support fanless designs.

Specifications listed for the IVP-7500 include:

  • Processor — Via Eden ULV clocked at 1GHz with Via CX700M2 Unified Digital Media IGP chipset
  • Memory — Up to 1GB DDR2 533/400 via SODIMM socket; ECC support for DDR2 400
  • Display — Support for VGA/LCD panel with Via UniChrome Pro II 3D/2D AGP graphics
  • Video support — MPEG-2/4; WMV9 video decoding acceleration
  • Audio — Via VT1708B high definition audio codec
  • Storage — 1 x UltraDMA 133/100/66/33 interface with FFC connector for 1.8-inch HDD
  • USB — 2 x USB 2.0 ports; 1 x USB 2.0 pin header
  • GPS — LeadTek LR9102/LP GPS module (via COM2 I/F with external I-PEX antenna)
  • Bluetooth — QCOM Bluetooth module via USB
  • FM transmitter — NS73M61AU chip, offering FM transmission frequency from 87.5 MHz to 108MHz
  • Other I/O:
    • 1 x TV-out
    • 1 x V-CAM jack
    • 1 x A/V in
    • 1 x VGA pin header
    • 1 x LCD panel (TTL) connector
    • 1 x COM port pin header
    • 1 x audio jack for Line-out
    • 1 x IR receiver pin header
  • Power — 1 x +12V DC-in 3-pin (battery) interface; 1 x +12V DC-in jack (power adapter) interface; on/off switch; system power management
  • Operating temperature — 32 to 140 deg. F (0 to 60 deg. C)
  • Dimensions — 4.5 x 7.3 inches (114 x 185.5mm)
  • Operating system — Linux; Windows XP Embedded; Windows CE

Stated Daniel Wu, VP, Via Embedded, Via Technologies, “The VIA IVP-7500 carries our expertise in developing stable, compact, energy-efficient systems to this high-growth sector.”

Availability

Via is now offering samples of the Via IVP-7500 board to project customers. More information information may be found here.


 
This article was originally published on LinuxDevices.com and has been donated to the open source community by QuinStreet Inc. Please visit LinuxToday.com for up-to-date news and articles about Linux and open source.



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